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at columbia. his first night in new york city -- where did he spend a? >> guest: is very dubious about this in my book, but he -- he couldn't get into his apartment. he couldn't get the key of the sublet of the front of his mother's. so he slept outside of his suitcase. he said he had called and came over there the next morning. >> host: genevieve makes the scene in new york city. who is that? >> guest: genevieve cook is an australian who's mother had a second marriage to a notable american, so the family kind of had american ties. she came to new york city and met barack obama after he graduated columbia. they had a lot in common from the moment they met. they both had indonesian connections. the father and mother had lived in indonesia. he was a diplomat. and so she had lived there. her family was in the upper crust. and so she and barry both have this connection -- the indonesian connections as well. [inaudible] a fabulous researcher at "the washington post" and gabriel banks. eventually i found her and i can tell all that story because not because of the book but because of she had
a nuclear bomb in new york city or something like that. it is very compelling. well, the argument is that if you use racial determination for college admissions, it is likely that there will be somewhat more -- somewhat more of unrehearsed, interracial conversations are in especially among students. under the african-american kids and a latino kids who get these preferences -- they will say something to the white kids and asian kids that have overwhelming compelling educational benefits for them. that is a argument that the university of texas is arguing. that is an exception of non-discrimination that the supreme court has recognized. okay? okay. i think that's ridiculous. and, indeed, the reason the court buys this is because there are social sciences out there and scientists who say this is true. now, increasingly, these educational benefits, which, you know, make only marginal improvements to education access, they are disputed. you know, it is increasingly disputed that their are any educational benefits. but i think it is also important for the court to bear in mind, and i t
. elect tri-city costs in the next 15 years. if you manufacture and establish the united states, you take advantage of the many trade agreements the united states has with the countries. whether it's a japanese cut me, thai company can chinese company manufactures in the united states, employing good american workers. .. >> the key is having the right set of advisors from investment bankers to accounting firms and law firms and pr firms and management consulting firms. >> we will leave it there. think you all for coming. think everyone. [applause] i was just going to thank everyone at asia society.org. thank you both for being here. it has been a great pleasure. [applause] [inaudible conversations] >> if we turn away from the needs of others, we align ourselves with those forces which are bringing about the greatest suffering. >> obesity in this country is nothing short of a public health crisis. >> i think i have intentness that went up and told me when someone had their own agenda. >> i think that they serve as a window on the path to past what was going on with american women. >> she b
the significance of stem within schools and colleges around the city, and i challenge every single youth parliament member here today to go away to your cities and councils and partner organizations and try to encourage them to incorporate the significance of stem program within your schools and colleges and come back next year and share with us what you found. these are the jobs of the knowledge economy. >> now, i'm looking for a london woman. a london woman who has not spoken before. have you spoken before? you did. i think it wouldn't be fair to others. i thought you had spoken earlier. this woman is going to fall off her seat and i want to see that. that would be a sadness. >> i'm -- thank you, mr. speaker. thank you. [applause] >> anybody here who knows today that i was desperate to pike about this? i was on bbc news and a woman told me i didn't deserve is because i -- i'm going to use that speakers on bbc so clearly she made no sense. [applause] [cheers and applause] >> reversely, i would just like to say i'm so happy that this is one of the top five issues. education is the fuel of knowledge
congo. the rebel group m23 captured territory from the troops and seized the city. actor and activist testified about his recent visit to the reaming. it's three hours. the situation the democratic republican of the congo continues to evolve. it's driven by a complex interplay of regional, power dynamics as well as an entry candidate web of economic and social issues. what is clear that the situation in the drc is tragic for the innocent people caught in the conflict. innocent people trying to raise their families and live their lives. as i have fold the media coverage of the situationed in the drc, i can't help but reflect on the manies of innocent people around the world who are caught in fundamentally unjust and socially complex situations. these situations can make anyone's heart break and naturally leads one to consider the simple question what can be done? one thing it sure makes me appreciate our country. you know, i have heard that less than 2% of the people that have ever lived here on the earth have lived under the kind of freedoms that we enjoy. we are so blessed when we se
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5